Feeds

ISPs fly to continent to escape RIP

Suncream optional

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

New hybrid storage solutions

Two more ISPs have threatened to up sticks and move their email systems overseas if the government goes ahead with its planned Web snooping plans.

London-based ClaraNet is having internal discussions to shift its server infrastructure to its Paris office. It is concerned about government access to keys, and it says if this part of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill does not change it will take legal advice on the move to France. If it transpires that its customers will not be covered by RIP if its servers are on the continent, it will re-locate.

GreenNet says it is also considering a move, but it is thinking about shifting its servers to Ireland. It says the government is destroying trust in the Net with its plans. It is able to put its servers in another country through its involvement with the Association for Progressive Communications network.

"Ireland is something that's been mentioned, it doesn't have the same restrictive laws," said Phil Carr, GreenNet user support manager. He is shocked by the Home Office's proposals regarding interception capabilities. "It's quite unprecedented that a government would want to do this kind of thing in peacetime."

Steve Rawlinson, ClaraNet systems manager, said: "We are concerned that it will affect our customers' confidence. The business customers, who have customers of their own, may move to an ISP that is not based in the UK."

The move is not a problem for ClaraNet, it has offices in France and Germany. But it could prove a costly decision for other ISPs without this offshore advantage.

"If we're thinking of moving, I'm sure a lot of other people are thinking of it too," he warned.

The comments came as the Home Office today unveiled a batch of lengthy draft codes on RIP. They say the government will only service orders to disclose decryption keys on company directors, and not on other staff as was originally planned. They also say that companies will be able to provide a text alternative.

But critics said the codes still failed to spell out the exact circumstances which would force a company to hand over keys, and that police at superintendent level would still be able to apply for communications data gathered during interception.

RIP goes to the Report Stage in the House of Lords tomorrow - where there will be 102 amendments to plough through on still unresolved legal and tehnical issues.

Last week British not-for-profit ISP Poptel also threatened to move some of its services overseas unless more changes were made to RIP. It was concerned about the practical implications of the Bill for its customers, many of which are trade unions and non-governmental organisations. ®

Related stories
RIP Bill

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Why Oracle CEO Larry Ellison had to go ... Except he hasn't
Silicon Valley's veteran seadog in piratical Putin impression
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.