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Pentium 4 pricing revealed

And no bus licence for t'others

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Sources close to Intel's plans have now revealed the prices for the first two flavours of the up-and-coming Pentium 4, formerly codenamed Willamette.

The Pentium 4 running at 1.3GHz will cost $795 when it debuts in September, with its 1.4GHz brother coming in at $895.

But Intel will attempt to start its familiar pricing scheme only two months later in November this year, with the 1.3GHz costing $625 and the 1.4GHz $795.

Those prices will be for units of 1000 but indicate further speeds and a typical Intel price curve over the months to come.

Intel, as expected, has now placed the Almador family of microprocessors on its roadmap, and has started talking about the Pentium III fabbed at 0.13 micron.

And the company, the same sources reveal, will not license the Pentium 4 buses to other companies, implying that the chipsets will stay firmly in Chipzilla mitts.

The system price with Rambus RIMMs and an Intel motherboard based on the Tehama chipset is expected to be high. We shall have more details later this week. ®

(Apologies for an earlier edit of this story where the prices were originally transposed)

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