Feeds

‘Magnificent breasts’ get pulled by content security firm

They're not chicken

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

Email monitoring is set to be the next cyber cash-cow, according to a report out today.

It may sound slightly Big Brotherish, but more and more companies are latching onto the idea of monitoring staff email to stop unwanted or dangerous data from entering or exiting their cyberwalls.

IDC has forcasted that the worldwide market for content security will reach $952 million in 2004, compared to the paltry $66 million that was generated last year.

Content security covers items such as attachments, .exe files, viruses, porn or spam sent via the Net or email. Products allow firms to scan traffic for excessive file size, corrupted data, or words and phrases that may cause offence - such as profanities, porn, or racist or sexist remarks.

But how can companies be sure that their security software will only throw out the dangerous stuff? How will the technology know that the incoming email headed "Tart" isn't actually a message from someone's mum, refering to her secret family recipe for Treacle Tart?

"It depends on the context," explained Chris Heslop, marketing director at UK content security firm Content Technologies. "For example, 'Breast' would be OK within the context of chicken. But in the context of 'magnificent', well that's different."

Indeed. Magnificent chicken breasts could prove extremely offensive to a vegetarian.

Anyway, the point is that a whole mixture of nasties can now be spread by the exploding medium of the Web, which can damage a company's reputation as well as its customer confidentiality, or risk virus infection. Alternatively, this type of monitoring activity spells less freedom for staff using the Internet at work.

According to Content Technologies, the US content security market is being driven by legal concerns, while European companies are more worried about privacy issues, and in Asia/Pacific the protection of intellectual property is a key factor.

Last year a bunch of staff at The New York Times were fired for sending "offensive" and smutty emails. They were found out when the company intercepted internal emails. ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.