Feeds

Oz biz promises 24x7 Net access for Palm

Australian co. hooks Palm V into wonderful world of WAP

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Australian mobile comms company DotWap yesterday said it will provide local Palm V users with 24x7 wireless Internet access next October.

DotWap, which enthusiastically describes itself as "one of the fast-movers of the wireless communications world", plans to provide a WAP-enabled device that clips onto the Palm V in much the same way as the palmtop's docking cradle does. Presumably, the idea is that the device will pull WML (Wireless Markup Language - WAP's answer to HTML) files across the airwaves and render them on the Palm's screen.

WAP was, of course, developed for cellphones, so the look and feel is a tad on the basic side and unlikely to provide quite as rich a browsing experience as Palm's own Web Clipping technology, which pares down regular Web pages to fit the handheld's screen.

Palm recently announced the worldwide roll-out of its Palm Wireless Net kit, which will connect the company's machines to the Net via cellphones and wireless modems. DotWap's product will initially be available only in Australia, with an Asia Pacific roll-out "soon". The company hasn't said when the product will be made available to the rest of the world.

Nor has it said how it will provide "true wireless Internet connectivity, 24 hours a day, seven days a week". Clearly, the company is going to need cellular network partners from whom it can purchase bandwidth. It has yet to announce who it has signed up - or is at least talking to.

DotWap's device will "enable consumers to be online permanently anytime, anywhere without having to first dial up using a mobile phone. Users will pay only for the data, not the amount of time spent connected to the Internet".

That's pretty much how Palm's Palm.Net operates: users pay for the number of bytes of data they transfer to their handhelds, not for their airtime.

However, if our experience of WAP is anything to go by, the service isn't going to be exactly as 'instant access' as DotWap would hope. The device may open a data call to the Net as soon as it's switched on, and maintain that connection, but WAP servers are still at the mercy of the world wide wait - the cricket scores aren't going to come through that quickly. ®

Related Stories

Palm to bring wireless Net to its PDAs
Palm preps summer launch for Euro Palm.net
Porn mongers WAP off online
We've found a good WAP idea!

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Microsoft: Azure isn't ready for biz-critical apps … yet
Microsoft will move its own IT to the cloud to avoid $200m server bill
Oracle reveals 32-core, 10 BEEELLION-transistor SPARC M7
New chip scales to 1024 cores, 8192 threads 64 TB RAM, at speeds over 3.6GHz
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
Object storage bods Exablox: RAID is dead, baby. RAID is dead
Bring your own disks to its object appliances
Nimble's latest mutants GORGE themselves on unlucky forerunners
Crossing Sandy Bridges without stopping for breath
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?