Feeds

MS hands out gongs to star programmers

PowerPup engineers mysteriously snubbed

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Microsoft has inaugurated a "Distinguished Engineers" programme and announced the first recipients. In a letter leaked to Dave Winer's Userland scripting website, Microsoft's Steve Ballmer says the first sixteen DEs are "visionaries... unparalleled and essential to our long-term success".

The gongs go to some familiar and well-respected names. Dave Cutler, ex-DECcie responsible for the design of Windows NT, heads the list, which also includes the great ex-IBM, Tandem, DEC survivor (and author of the TPC Benchmarks) Jim Gray, and ex-DEC and Xerox PARC veterans Chuck Thacker and Butler Lampson. Thacker now heads the Microsoft Research Lab in Cambridge, England.

They aren't the only ex-DECcies on the list. Others include Mark Lucovsky (NT design) and Wael Bahaa-El-Din (performance analysis).

Also honoured are Lou Perazzoli (NT design), Peter Spiro (SQL Server), Anders Hejlsberg (Visual J++, C#), Mohsen Al-Ghosein (middleware), Suryanarayanan Raman (apps and Internet), Brad Lovering (tools), Antoine Leblond (Office - and the man most culpable for letting the Power Pup slip through - thanks, Antoine), Michael Toutonghi (.NET) and software Veep Darryl Rubin.

Microsoft veteran Charles "lpfnChuck" Simonyi gets one too. Simonyi has spent the last ten years out of harm's way, working on Intentional Programming (as opposed to Unintentional Programming? - ed), but is still notorious for devising Hungarian Notation, a Byzantine variable naming convention christened in his honour

Register Footnote: We were intrigued that Michael Toutonghi's biog includes a reference to OmniView, whcih is described as a "multi-tasking environment". Once we'd composed ourselves after learning that that Microsoft actually has a multi-tasking environment, we set about trying to recall what OmniView was. We know that Microsoft made efforts to make its Windows 1.0 and 2.0 .PIF-compatible with TopView, the clunking DOS task-switcher IBM touted, then abandoned in the mid-80s. But between that and the task-switcher in DOS 5.0 which crept out in 1991, we can only draw a blank. Do any Register readers ever recall seeing OmniView? Come on, Michael. Don't be coy now... (Hint: This wasn't a Microsoft product, but whose was it? And what happened to it? - Ed) ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE
Tim Berners-Lee isn't happy, but we should be
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

Best practices for enterprise data
Discussing how technology providers have innovated in order to solve new challenges, creating a new framework for enterprise data.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?