Feeds

Multi-layer storage disks kick DVD's ass

How about $5 for 1GB of Flash memory

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

A data storage technique has been developed by Constellation 3D that could wipe the floor with CD and DVD technology.

The company has developed multi-layer disks, which it says could eventually hold a terabyte of data, at a fraction of the current cost.

The new disks, which will be ready for market in just over a year, will have much lower production costs, and will undercut flash memory by a huge margin.

Patrick Maloney, SVP Business Development at C3D, commented: "If you could buy 1GB of flash memory, it would cost you around $2000. We anticipate our disks will cost around $2 each to make."

He says that once the market pushes the price down, the disks will probably retail for around $5.

The prototype disk spins at 35rps enabling data transfer rates of 100MBps - significantly up on DVD. At present, the company only has analogue disks, but says that by autumn this year the digital version will be ready for demonstrations.

The problem with current optical storage is that the technology is operating close to its theoretical limits. By using a fluorescent polymer on the surface of a disk, data can be read simply by detecting the presence of a fluorescent flash.

IBM spent a small fortune - $100 million - on research into optical multi-layer storage before deciding it was not a feasible prospect. Using reflective technology, the signal quickly degrades as the number of layers increased.

The new fluorescent technology retains the signal quality much longer, since the light is totally incoherent. Several layers are integrated into the media, separated by distances as small as 15 microns. A laser focuses on one layer at a time, reading or writing to each separately.

Next summer will see the arrival of ROM versions, with recording versions following in the winter of 2001. The company also plans to release a credit card sized version, which will hold 5GB of data. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.