Feeds

Adobe lashes out at Mac rumour site

Seeks $10m damages, jury trial over AppleInsider's Photoshop 6 leak

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Graphics software specialist Adobe has launched an all-out legal offensive against Mac News Network (MacNN) after the Apple-watching Web site's AppleInsider page posted a sneak preview of the next version of Adobe's flagship title, Photoshop.

Not to be satisfied with a mere 'pull the story or we sue your ass off' - the usual approach taken by the computer industry in such cases - Adobe has gone the whole nine yards and filed a lawsuit alleging MacNN "willfully and maliciously misappropriated... confidential and proprietary information" in violation of California's Trade Secrets Act.

The upshot, Adobe claims, is that the company's business has been irreparably harmed - presumably it believes no one is now going to buy the current Photoshop release - and wants significant punitive and actual damages from MacNN. Adobe has "tens of millions of dollars" in mind, which probably explains why it's asking for a jury trial.

The suit also calls for temporary and permanent injunctions against MacNN and AppleInsider from doing anything similar ever again.

The suit, however, has wider implications. Adobe's claim is that AppleInsider's request for inside information from companies working in the Mac market is unlawful since it encourages the distribution of protected trade secrets, again in violation of the California Civil Code. If successful, Adobe would be setting a precedent against numerous Web-based rumour sites, not only in the Mac arena but those covering the wider IT market.

Adobe does have a case here. Its pre-release material is confidential (and almost certainly clearly marked as such) and it has a right to ensure that it remains so. It's questionable whether releasing such material - details of a new version that everyone knows is coming anyway - without permission is in the public interest.

That said, Adobe does seem to have been rather heavy handed in this case. Previous leaks, such as a German Web site's reproduction of Apple photos of the then unreleased iMac DV, are usually pulled after a stern request from the aggrieved company's lawyers. We can only assume Adobe asked first, and MacNN told it where it could stick its threat.

Which is likely to prove a decision MacNN will regret, assuming there's no out-of-court settlement (though we suspect there will be).

Incidentally, Apple Insider looks like a pretty good source for beta software leaks. The site also features "An Inside Look at Office 2001: Microsoft Word 2001".

Dated 13 June, 2000, the piece kicks off: "For some time now, the Macintosh Business Unit over at Microsoft has been hard at work on the successor to..." - and then:

"Article Remove 9PM EST By the Demand of Microsoft Corp, Inc." ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.