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Rambus exec kicked out of DDR seminar

He hadn't registered, that was his problem

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Senior suits at chipset manufacturer Via Technologies confirmed today they had expelled a Rambus executive from their midst.

The incident occurred at a DDR (double data rate) seminar Via held Monday last, confirmed Richard Brown, marketing director of Via worldwide. Via hosted the event.

A man who Brown named as Richard Crisp, a senior executive at Rambus Inc, had not registered and was therefore requested to leave the forum, said Brown.

Via had hosted the several hour long seminar in a bid to explain to journalists, analysts and the like its commitment to DDR (double data rate) memory and the PC-133 SDRAM (syncrhonous random access memory) it pushed at last year's Computex show.

Rambus appears implacably opposed to the standard, but Brown insisted that the expulsion was a matter of protocols, rather than any opposition to Rambus, the company.

Rambus could not be contacted at press time for its view on the matter. (We do wish Rambus would drop us the occasional line or two -- we'd like to put its point of view too.) ®

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