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Mosel predicts rapid death of SDRAM

DDR will take its place. Wot, no Rambus?

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Memory company Mosel Vitelic said today it has introduced 64Mb double data rate memory (DDR) and forecast that during the second half of this year, the standard will displace current PC-133 memory modules.

Rajit Shah, worldwide VP of sales and marketing at Mosel Vitelic, said that his firm anticipated PC memory sales to be very strong in the second half of this year, and during 2001 and 2002, and will propel his firm past the $1 billion mark in terms of turnover this year.

He said: "Today we're positioned to support a lot of tier one customers worldwide." IBM, Dell and Gateway are major customers of Mosel Vitelic, he said.

"We're getting to a point where we need more capacity and we have to be careful to select partners on a long term basis and joint ventures with tier one customers."

Figures supplied by Mosel Vitelic in conjunction with Instat predict that DRAM will grow from $29.18 billion this year, to $39.1 billion in 2001 and $46.5 billion in 2002. The average selling price of 256Mb SRAM (static RAM) will drop from $46 this year to $26 in 2002. ®

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