Feeds

The Beast whinges

Sniff...

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

MS on Trial When Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson returned from lunch on Wednesday, he blew Microsoft's mind. The Beast had been busy arguing that it needed a good six months more to mount a proper, lingering defence.

"This case has been pending for two years," a florid Jackson shot back. Then he ordered the US Department of Justice (DoJ) to run up a plan to break the beast into three pieces, separating operating system, applications, and Internet concerns including browser, portal and ISP. He said he wanted it fast, by the end of the week, and gave the company a mere 48 hours to reply.

The most important company in human history had been denied due process, Microsoft lawyers cried.

It was a sunny afternoon in Washington as the flacks gathered on the courthouse steps, eager to spin the day's events.

"It was incumbent upon us to inform the court, and the record, that there was a good deal of evidence that we thought was pertinent to the subject of appropriate relief, and to make that a part of the record," Microsoft General Counsel and silver-tongued-devil William Neukom sniffed at a press conference outside the courthouse.

The vultures circled with delight. "Not only will the world not end if there is a break-up of Microsoft, but it will be a much better world for the industry, for consumers and for innovation," Computer and Communications Industry Association spokesman Ed Black commented.

The CCIA assisted in drafting the brief of Amici Curiae which originally suggested to Judge Jackson the undeniable charm of a three-way break-up.

DoJ lawyer David Boies said the Department would have the requested paperwork in Jackson's hands by Friday. He seemed not at all distressed, suggesting that the DoJ might just have seen fit to get such a document ready in draft form, set to go after a bit of buffing. He would not confirm that such a document exists, but we have our suspicions.

One can only hope that the other side condescended to read the enemy Amicus brief, and that it saw fit to anticipate it with a bit of legalistic boilerplate which they can now buff up and submit. Otherwise, the lights are going to be on very late in Redmond. Very late indeed. ®

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Why Oracle CEO Larry Ellison had to go ... Except he hasn't
Silicon Valley's veteran seadog in piratical Putin impression
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.