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Gov't tries to make IT projects run on time

Plans so radical, it will be years before ordinary business catches up

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The Government has published a report outlining 30 ways it can ensure major public sector IT projects go to plan - and to budget.

Among them, the report recommends that:

  • civil servants view IT projects as part of a "whole process of business change" and not just a separate "add-on".
  • one person is made responsible for the management of project, to "streamline decision-making and banish confusions".
  • Government manages its suppliers far more effectively. It's recommended that before contracts are signed suppliers must produce "detailed plans covering resources, timescales and technology".
  • key staff are trained.
  • projects will be reviewed.

These recommendations are so radical it could be years before ordinary businesses catch-up and adopt this new heightened way of thinking.

Who'd have thought it, getting a proper job before you appoint a contractor and actually having people in charge who know what's what. Brilliant. Quite brilliant. ®

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