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1999 Reg Stories of the Year

Some of the good, one of the bad and a few uglies

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Your super soaraway Register has broken a good old number of stories this year, with only one or two bad eggs amongst them, despite our detractors. Here's a selection of some breaking stories and while you may have your own favourites, we thought these were worth a reprise as 1999 gallops to a close. Hardcore porn ads sneak past Excite filters Our Tim Richardson had a world exclusive with this one back in July, when he revealed that Excite wasn't able to filter out child pornography. The story is here. Porno cyber squatters target Intel Linda Harrison discovered that some smut-vendors were taking the good name of Chipzilla in vain with this story here. Woman walks away from $70k online gambling debt And Sean Fleming had a cooking goodie with this number, where he described how online gaming isn't everything that it appears to be. Go here. Caldera judge finds MS grossly misprepresented facts This was a good one from Grahame Lea, who opened a can of worms about DR-DOS and how Microsoft managed to re-seal it with the worms still wriggling inside. Go here. Earthquake costs Taiwan semicon industry $300m Simon Burns was on the spot when the big quake hit Taiwan in autumn. Here's his report. BT declares war against The Register The Kafkaesque bureaucracy of BT got us in early September, when the mammoth company managed to put a stop to La Registra once and for all. Drew Cullen reported the story here. Eclipse update: Apple PR stunt shocks World Young Tony Smith scored a coup when he reported in August on Apple's most audacious PR coup yet -- managing to persuade the cosmic powers to display the Apple logo on the moon as the sun eclipsed the satellite, here. Intel 1100MHz Athlon killer to launch in December? Hmm.. Pete Sherriff really shivered a lot of timbers with this story, which suggested that Chipzilla would manage to get a 1GHz Willamette out by this Yule. You'll find the whoopsie here. Merced -- those pictures Not-so-young Mike Magee happened to have his camera on him in February and secured the first pictures of the Merced (now Itanium) processor at the end of February. You'll find them here. And all this was despite the fact that "the animals" (how Intel describes the trade press) got their mitts on Intel's Official Guide to the European press. ®

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