Feeds

Amazon sells Phantom Menace for 12p

People buying 200 copies a time

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Amazon.co.uk is holding an urgent internal investigation after it offered the video Star Wars: Episode 1 - The Phantom Menace for just 12p (20 cents). Including postage and packing and VAT, the sum total for the video comes to a bank-breaking £3. The Register understands that some people have ordered as many as 200 copies. A spokeswoman for Amazon.co.uk said she was aware of the decimal point slip and that the matter was under investigation. She wouldn't say how many had been ordered. In a statement today, the company said it would honour purchases at the knockdown price on the basis of one copy per customer. Last year e-tailer Wstore said a computer glitch was responsible for reducing the prices of some PCs from £1200 to just £12. And Argos sold Sony TVs for just £3. Related Stories WStore offers 99 per cent discount on PCs - kinda Argos welshes on three quid TV Net 'offer'

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence
Download Choosing a Cloud Hosting Provider with Confidence to learn more about cloud computing - the new opportunities and new security challenges.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.