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Compaq outsells Dell by 1m units in Q1

But can't regain top slot in home country

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Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Worldwide PC shipments topped 30 million units for the first quarter of 2000, according to a report by IDC. Volume showed 20 per cent year on year growth to 30.4 million units, fuelled by healthy consumer demand in markets in Asia, but represented an overall sequential decline of 9.3 per cent. The Asia Pacific and Japanese markets showed growth of 36 per cent and 35 per cent respectively. US sales totalled 11.6 million units on 17 per cent growth, IDC reported. According to rival research company Dataquest, worldwide PC shipments grew 15 per cent during the quarter to 29.9 million. Both agreed that Compaq was still hanging onto the biggest share of the world market. IDC found Compaq delivered almost four million PCs and held 13.1 per cent of the market, whereas Dataquest reported 3.8 million units or 12.5 per cent of the market. Dell came second with both research companies giving it around three million units and 10 per cent market share. It was followed by Hewlett Packard, with 2.5 million units and eight per cent, and IBM with 1.8 million or six per cent. In the US, Dell held onto the top position, with 1.9 million units or almost 17 per cent of the market, both IDC and Dataquest found. Compaq had 16.4 per cent, HP just over 12 per cent, Gateway nine per cent and, replacing IBM in the number five slot, eMachines with almost five per cent of the market. Both Dell and Compaq's US figures suffered from sluggish businesses PC sales. IBM's unit growth in the US was said to have been "severely impacted" by its withdrawal from retail as well as Y2K which cut demand for commercial desktops. In Europe, Internet demand and cheaper PCs continued to spur consumer sales. "The global consumer appetite for PCs helped offset a Y2K-induced slowdown in commercial market interest in PCs," said Bruce Stephen, IDC group vice president of Personal Systems research. "Looking ahead, IDC believes that commercial market demand has started to stabilise in most major regions of the world, and purchase patterns should return to more normal rates during the second half of the year." ® Related stories IDC adds VA Linux Systems to survey server elite Dell hits No 1 in global PC marketUnsaturated low fat diet for European PC vendors PC sales up 23 per cent last year despite Y2K</</p>

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