AMD Athlons as scarce as hen's teeth

Kneebone connected to the thighbone

Just a few days after we reported on Intel's continuing shortage of Coppermine microprocessors -- which the long-toothed will remember started the day after they were launched last October 25th -- the effects are beginning to have an effect on AMD and its performing Athlon platform. European distributors reported to us last Thursday that from having a healthy supply of AMD microprocessors from the very beginning of this year, a combination, made up of several factors had caused shortages to appear in the marketplace. The first factor was that an inability of distributors to get enough supplies from Intel had led their resellers to start asking for AMD chips instead. This trend has been exacerbated by swingeing price cuts AMD makes on its Athlon prices later on this week, which have had the effect of making the microprocessor more attractive. The second factor is that AMD's fabrication capabilities are not, as yet, sufficient for them to supply as many Athlon chips as they would wish to. Fab 30, AMD's Dresden plant, is not expected to start producing chips in volume for several more weeks. The third factor is that AMD itself was restricting supplies of some of its microprocessors as they reached an end-of-line situation, in advance of its simultaneous roll out of its up and coming Thunderbird and Spitefire chips in June. Shortages have been confirmed not only by Euro distributors of AMD products, but from PC manufacturers who also make the chips. A version of Caesar III specifically designed for the PC industry is now an urgent requirement, so that the world+dog can see the effects lack of microprocessors will have on other peripherals including memories, graphics cards, and the rest. ® See also AMD takes axe to Athlon prices Intel confirms major chip shortages

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