Jenkins Web site protests killer's innocence

He didn't do it, claims remarkably honest and comprehensive site

Sion Jenkins, the deputy headmaster found guilty of murdering his foster daughter has set up a Web site claiming a miscarriage of justice. Jenkins was jailed for life in July 1998 for battering 13-year-old Billie-Jo to death with a tent peg. His prosecution rested mainly on the discovery of 150 "invisible" blood spots on his clothing. Jenkins' erratic behaviour that day and several weak "revelations" about his character that appeared during the trial helped convince the jury that he had murdered Billie-Jo and then taken his daughters out shopping in an attempt to produce an alibi. The site itself is surprisingly honest and comprehensive. The prosecution's arguments are spelt out and bias is relatively constrained. The background behind the case is factual and the site is helpfully split into sections. Whether or not Sion Jenkins is guilty of murdering his step-daughter, the site does raise some interesting questions (the case has also been the subject of Channel 4's Trial and Error investigative programme). To The Register's mind, this is exactly the kind of use that the Internet ought to be put to - who, for example, would ever have access to this information if it weren't on the Web? If Jenkins is guilty of the crime, no number of Web sites is going to help him get out. If on the other hand he is innocent, this fits in with the old philosophy of the Net acting as an empowerer of the common people (remember those idealistic times before big business assumed control?). ® Link Justice for Jenkins

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