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Totalise bribes students – all in a good cause

Do your homework, get good grades, win some shares

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Students who do well in their exams this year could be entitled to a rack of shares as part of a initiative to reward their academic efforts - as if working hard and getting good grades so they can get a job, mortgage, house, spouse, kids etc isn't reward enough. Totalise - the British ISP that gives away its shares to its users - reckons its examboost scheme could be just what some students need to help them pass their exams. The number of shares students get depends on how well they do. An 'A' Level student who picks up an A grade will be given 40 shares, while an E is only worth eight. Three straight As at 'A' Level would net some 120 shares - worth around £60 at today's share price. The shares are currently tradeable on OFEX. To register for the shares students need to visit the examboost Web site here. "A lot of work goes into exams and very little is given to students in return; now they will be able to see a direct benefit for the time and energy they have put into their studies," said Peter Gregory, CEO of Totalise. "Especially when you consider that the average student ends up with debts of around £9000 at the end of a standard degree, examboost will help reduce the burden of studying as well. "Now, a student with three As at A Level will have at least £60 to help towards this," he said. Gosh. £60 towards £9000 debt. Wow. That's about as useful as a £3 record token. Unfortunately, examboost is only open to students studying 'A' Levels, GCSEs, HNQs, and CSYS, among others. The scheme is not available to undergraduates. Nor is it available to anyone who has already passed their exams. Which is probably just as well because everyone knows that passing exams is easier today than it was when we were at school. Kids today, don't know they're born. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

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