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Quake developer not responsible for school killings – judge

Paducah killer's actions could not be foreseen

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Quake-maker id Software is not guilty of producing games that warp children into mindless killers, a US court ruled yesterday. The $33 million case was brought by parents of kids killed by fellow pupils at the Heath High School in Paducah in 1997. They alleged that, as a keen player of violent computer games, killer Michael Carneal was essentially re-enacting what he had seen on screen. In that respect, they claimed, the likes of id were responsible for the killer's actions. According to id CEO Todd Hollenshead, US District Judge Edward Johnstone, presiding over the so-called James Case, dismissed the suit against id - and other computer game companies - on all grounds. The judge ruled that games companies could not predict what players would do after playing titles likes Quake. He also ruled that games are not subject to product liability law. The parents said they will appeal the decision, according to the Associated Press wire. ® Related Stories Ban Quake, Home Office adviser demands Brazil bans Quake and other PC games

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