Feeds

Judge's Java findings may trigger Sun suit against MS

But maybe Sun's just making more mischief

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes

MS on Trial Sun has started briefing the press on the possibility of it mounting a private antitrust suit against Microsoft. That of course doesn't mean that Sun will mount such a suit - it may well be that the company will be happy enough with the mischief the suggestions will cause for Microsoft. And of course by bringing private antitrust suits further up the news agenda, Sun is likely to encourage more aggrieved parties and sundry ambulance-chasers to go after Redmond. But as Sun puts it, the company is "obligated" to look at suing. In his Conclusions of Law published this week, it was to be expected that Judge Jackson would come down heavily against Microsoft on the subject of Netscape, but he also covered Java in some detail, and this is where Sun's 'obligation' comes in. By concluding that Microsoft deliberately set out to wreck Java, and even hurt itself in order to achieve this goal, Jackson could be said to have handed Sun a loaded pistol. The judge has ruled that Microsoft hurt Java, and therefore cost Sun money, so Sun's shareholders could reasonably expect the company's officers to look at the likelihood of extracting compensation. Sun does however have a long record of trying to pull the antitrust strings against Microsoft without (excepting the Java action) actually putting itself into the front line, and this goes back to well before the current action. More recently the company has 'helpfully' suggested Microsoft should be split into three companies (with the OS itself also sent three ways), forced to publish its APIs and have its pricing and contracts rigorously controlled. Sun boss Scott McNealy has also frequently recommended that Microsoft be prevented from spending its large cash pile on buying its way into new markets. Aside from this pot-stirring, Sun has its own Java copyright infringement suit running against Microsoft, and is one of the companies that triggered the separate European probe into the company's activities. So maybe it's busy enough without an antitrust action too. ® Complete Register Trial coverage

A new approach to endpoint data protection

More from The Register

next story
Amazon says Hachette should lower ebook prices, pay authors more
Oh yeah ... and a 30% cut for Amazon to seal the deal
Philip K Dick 'Nazi alternate reality' story to be made into TV series
Amazon Studios, Ridley Scott firm to produce The Man in the High Castle
Nintend-OH NO! Sorry, Mario – your profits are in another castle
Red-hatted mascot, red-colored logo, red-stained finance books
Sonos AXES support for Apple's iOS4 and 5
Want to use your iThing? You can't - it's too old
Joe Average isn't worth $10 a year to Mark Zuckerberg
The Social Network deflates the PC resurgence with mobile-only usage prediction
Feel free to BONK on the TUBE, says Transport for London
Plus: Almost NOBODY uses pay-by-bonk on buses - Visa
Twitch rich as Google flicks $1bn hitch switch, claims snitch
Gameplay streaming biz and search king refuse to deny fresh gobble rumors
Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE
4,000 pixels is niche now... Don't say we didn't warn you
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?