Feeds

Leak! Intel's server board strategy to 2002

Brace, brace it's codename conundrums

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

Part One Sources working within Intel in Europe have leaked comprehensive details of the firm's strategy for server boards which reveal plans the chip giant currently has up until the year 2002. Documents seen by The Register show that the firm is scrambling to ensure that its lucrative server business carries on being the cash cow to fuel future growth. As we revealed yesterday, internal rifts between motherboard and chipset divisions in the firm have caused bitterness, with heads rolling as those at the top try and sort out difficulties in the middle and the bottom of the firm. The roadmaps we have been shown are internal Intel documents and the firm is stressing to its customers that these are "preliminary" and "subject to change". In Q2 this year, Intel will release two important revs in its future plans. The S440GE2 board will use Ultra160, fast CuMine technology, have a 100MHz spin and will use either a Hudson (5U) or Byrd (2U) chassis. In Q1 next year, Intel will release the Juniper board, using Serverworks (Reliance) chipsets and supporting a dual Foster (Willamette) processor, and using the Hudson II chassis. Also in this quarter, Intel will introduce the Tupelo, again using Serverworks chipsets, and using the Hudson or the Byrd II chassis. The third Q1 intro will be the Ginkgo, once more based on a Serverworks chipset, and using the Hudson (5U) or the Byrd-II (2TU-TBD) chassis. As we revealed yesterday, Gingko will be followed by the Gingko-II using Tualatin, and again based on the Hudson or Byrd II chassis, during the first half of 2001. In the first half of 2002, Intel will introduce the Hickory board, based on two-way Gallatin technology, and using the Hudson II chassis. Juniper-II will tip up in the first half of 2002, again using a two-way Gallatin chipset. Intel has to perform quite a few conjuring tricks to make the transition from Lancewood L440GX+ technology. It has to move the Lancewood to the value segment, and add Hudson and Byrd chassis support to existing Lancewood motherboards. It will shift Lancewood out of the value segment to the performance segment by introducing its Glen Echo (S440GE2) board. That has to come in two stages, the first of which is to change the Hudson and Byrd chassis to support existing Lancewood boards, while minimising changes in the existing baseboard design. The second phase will be to add extra features to the Glen Echo S440GE2 board including U160 and faster processor support to the Lancewood design. Intel's board division is vastly increasing its motherboard factory capacity. The Lancewood factory has already increased support. In week ten of this year, Intel will have managed to double the output of the factory from week four. It may increase capacity after week ten, and expects to fix its backlog by week 13 because of the increase in capacity. Glen Echo will take over this increased support for the Lancewood production. But there are still severe material constraints on other products Intel is manufacturing. Sitka will be fully recovered from its backlog by around now using the P0CH SKU, Cypress boxed boards using the C440GX+ chipset were expected to recover by week nine. Cabrillo II and Astor II will recover from their backlogs by weeks ten and 14 respectively. However, Intel's Polar, Bear and Saber systems have constrained deliveries through to week 11, while key customers can expect full recover between weeks 12 and 14, in other words, round about now. To increase Lancewood capacity, Intel had to convert existing test equipment, and in week ten of this year added an SMT line to its factory and completed the installation of its test equipment. Lancewood will support all 100MHz system bus Pentium IIIs processors on Intel's roadmap, apart from the CuMine 850/100, where support for the product is planned. The 1GHz processor, however, does not seem to be part of these plans. ® Contents: Intel Server Board strategy to 2002 Page 2 Classy chassis, Glen Echo and Raid options Page 3 End of lines, dates, closures and $1.5 million in dosh Related Story Bitter war breaks out inside Intel

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
Special pleading against mass surveillance won't help anyone
Protecting journalists alone won't protect their sources
Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed
Remastered so hard it would be difficult or impossible to master it again
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.