Intel's server board strategy to 2002

End of lines, dates, closures and $1.5 million in dosh

Part Three How long will Intel's different server platforms survive? The source at Intel Europe who showed us the roadmaps this series is based on revealed projections for the different platforms already existing and yet to be announced. However, he stressed that these only projections, and refused to be drawn on how specific the dates were. Intel categorises its server offerings according to whether they are one-way, dual, four-way or eight-way. The one-way platform, Nightlight, which uses the T440BX chipset, will reach the end of the road by Q1 of 2000 On the two-way front, Nightshade (N440BX) will last for the same amount of time, while Lancewood (L440GX+) will survive into Q2 of next year. Glen Echo, soon to be announced, will extend well into 2001, while Cypress (C440GX+) will make it up until the end of Q1 next year. On the four-way front, Sitka (450NX) is projected to last until the beginning of next year, and in Q2 of this year Intel will release the Koa SPKA4, which will last through until Q3 next year. Aspen will die at the end of this year, while Apsen K, a variation of this board, will likely last for the same period. In eight-way servers, the Ocotillo, introduced in September last year, will likely survive until the end of this year, but sometime in Q2 Intel will introduce the Palmetto, an eight-way server with a long lifecycle. Glen Echo will be succeeded by a fresh update at the end of this year. Colusa II and Astor will be announced in July, while Cabrillo and Cabrillo will be announced in Q3 of this year. Colusa III and Astor II will be announced in Q1 of next year. In Q4 of 2001, Intel is likely to introduce an integrated Palmetto/Cabot system, while there will be a Palmetto Cascades board announced in the same time period, along with a Tanner and Cascades board. Cascades is not validated with Intel's Cypress board, and 133MHz chips won't work on these products, while Intel maintains that a 100MHz front-side bus large cache Cascades board will not be competitive in two way systems. Nor will Intel be able to validate the Cypress board for its up and coming Hudson chassis. According to Intel, it has not yet found any third-party Taiwanese boards using the Reliance (ServerWorks) chipset, giving it a clear window of selling opportunity. Intel will introduce a 'Synergy' programme to help its PC customers compete in the market, with $1.5 million being spent to allow what it dubs emerging solution providers to compete in the market. It will just focus on the server market, and will provide training, support and maintenance, being available to PC customers with an existing server business. ® Contents: Intel Server Board strategy to 2002 Page 1 Brace, brace! It's codename conundrums Page 2 Classy chassis, Glen Echo and Raid options Related Story Bitter war breaks out inside Intel

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