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L0pht develops Palm Pilot war dialler

Conduct 'security audits' while you run from the Feds

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Self-styled 'ethical hacking' outfit L0pht Heavy Industries has developed a free war-dialling utility for use with the Palm operating system. Known as TBA, the programme combines carrier logging, data-file manipulation, calling-card dialling options, and a handy battery meter display. Scans can be pre-set to attack a range of numbers at a predetermined time, and the selected range can be attacked in sequence or at random, L0pht says. Other user-defined options include sub-ranges of numbers to be excluded, the wait-time for no dial tone and the delay between attempts. Each number that answers with modem handshake tones is stored in a log file, which can be edited freely by the user. The purpose of this nifty little toy is to enable network administrators to test their security. Right, we're sure no one would, say, use it with a phreaked calling card to break into a remote system.... The utility can be downloaded, with detailed instructions, from the L0pht Web site. ®

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