Feeds

Share punters should hi-tail into hi-tech

bubble.dots may burst but tech stocks will stay steady

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

It seems there's almost a unanimous scream now from financial pundits on a pile of well known broadsheets about the dangers of investing in dot.com ventures, many of which appear to be wildly overvalued. But while many of these bubble.coms may float to the surface of public perception and then go pop, there's little likelihood that tech stocks will suffer and are likely to gain from the Internet explosion. While the bubble.dot companies are surfing on the huge waves of the Internet explosion and may crash on some pebble-strewn beaches, there are a number of large and well established technology firms which cannot lose, however badly the more public bubble.coms do. These firms, amongst which we can number at the infrastructure end Cisco, Nortel, Intel are quietly (and sometimes not so quietly) preparing themselves for the growth in Internet business. Unlike some of the bubble.coms, these people have real businesses and real products and services, and are akin to the plumbers, the carpenters, and the grocers that we all need for a well organised life. In a similar way, suppliers of server products and services, including firms like IBM, Compaq, HP and Dell are all going to do well out of the Internet, whatever the fate of the bubble.coms. The creation of large server farms all around the world is intended to support the level of business to business and other transactions that will take place over the Web. These firms, in turn, are supplied by a large base of component manufacturers who make the hard drives, graphics cards, monitors, memory firms and the rest, all of which are necessities for the Internet revolution. And there's also a myriad of other companies, including semiconductor companies like Intel (again), AMD, National Semiconductors and a host of others who will also do well out of the Web explosion simply because all of the above won't run without those bits of pieces. Big business seems worried by the bubble.coms, simply because of the large amount of money, albeit much of it on paper, to leverage other firms in what's become a crazy paperchase of the global stock market. Although no one is entirely clear which of the bubble.coms don't burst and which business models will and won't work, it's certain that a percentage, even if it's only a small percentage, will do very well. And the companies that underpin those are clearly going to rake in the Net benefits. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'
PM urged to 'prioritise issue' after Facebook hindsight find
Assange™ slumps back on Ecuador's sofa after detention appeal binned
Swedish court rules there's 'great risk' WikiLeaker will dodge prosecution
NSA mass spying reform KILLED by US Senators
Democrats needed just TWO more votes to keep alive bill reining in some surveillance
'Internet Freedom Panel' to keep web overlord ICANN out of Russian hands – new proposal
Come back with our internet! cries Republican drawing up bill
What a Mesa: Apple vows to re-use titsup GT sapphire glass plant
Commits to American manufacturing ... of secret tech
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Go beyond APM with real-time IT operations analytics
How IT operations teams can harness the wealth of wire data already flowing through their environment for real-time operational intelligence.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?