Etailers not as trustworthy as high street rivals

So says research from company with axe to grind…

Traditional high street brands such as M&S and Woolworth are more trustworthy than online ventures, according to research published by Taylor Nelson Sofres Group. Around two thirds of people questioned said bricks and mortar retailers were more trustworthy than their dotcom competitors. Seventeen per cent though that e-shopping would eventually mean the end of high street shops. The research was commissioned by e-commerce outfit, Instil. In a statement it said that traditional brands were "trustworthier than online ventures such as QXL and eBay". By a coincidence, Instil produces "turnkey e-business solutions" such as its "online auction solution". Ah hah. A company that sells online auction software commissioning research that shows that some online auctions aren't trusted? You don't think QXL and eBay use software that isn't produced by Instil, do you? A spokesman for the company said the research was completely above board and not intended to pull the wool over anyone's eyes. Alison Cabot, QXL's VP Communications, was not interested in the slur and would not comment on whether it -- or any other online operation -- was trustworthy or not. e-Bay was equally as blasé. Instead, it just wanted to have a pop at the competition and say that eBay UK was outperforming QXL. Its daily gross merchandise sales figure (GMS) is 500 percent greater that those of QXL.com, according to e-Bay. According to eBay.co.uk, it is grossing £90,000 per day as opposed to QXL's total European GMS of just £16,735. Online auction houses -- you can't trust 'em. ®

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