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Transmeta launches in London

But PR company decides not to tell us

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Transmeta CEO Dave Ditzel breezed into London today to launch its SuperHype Crusoe CPUs to an indifferent British public. The fabless -- and chipless -- and productless -- company did not extend an invitation to The Register, Europe's biggest IT news site, which is based in London. PR dummies of the Week are US company Ketchum Thomas PR. Its notion of engaging with British IT publications is to stick a notice up on Transmeta's web site. This follows: "Transmeta will be holding an exclusive European press conference at The Design Museum in London, England on February 21, complete with demos and presentations from CEO David Ditzel and VP of Marketing Jim Chapman. Please respond to the contacts above by February 16 to reserve your seat." Press conferences tend to work best when PR companies inform the journalists where and when they are to take place. Press conferences where journalists have to find out where and when they take place are not usually so successful. Or well attended. Perhaps Transmeta would consider hiring a European PR company next time. American imperialists on remote don't hack it with us. London is, incidentally, a peculiar place to hold an "exclusive" European press conference, given that it's CeBIT week. The world's biggest computer show springs into action, Thursday. Oh well: The Register's own Annie Kermath attended Transmeta's big US bash last month. So on the basis, that Ditzel is going to be mostly in reprise mode, here's a dusting down for our launch stories. On the slim chance that something stunning or new is announced today by Ditzel at London's achingly fashionable- but crap to get to unless you're ZDNet UK - London Design Museum, The Register is offering good rates for the story. You don't have to be a freelancer: we won't tell. ® Transmeta launch coverage Transmeta's real mystery: its OS tweaking auction No home for Rambus at Transmeta Transmeta could face Intel legal challenge A Linux, Transmeta Web-enabled Diamond Rio for CeBIT? Transmeta chips to run Linux, Windows, attack Intel x86 IT Network: When Crusoe met Speedstep IT Network: Crusoe explained

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

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