Feeds

How the FBI can r00t your hard drive

Man, these guys are good... they claim

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

The FBI is working hard to establish itself as the world's premier computer forensics expert. The Bureau has deployed 193 Special Agents devoted specifically to cyber crime, along with more than 100 related support personnel at FBI Headquarters in Washington, and 142 "parts examiners" busily recovering data from seized computers in the field, FBI Director Louis Freeh told the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee Wednesday. "These are people who can take evidence off a hard drive that even fairly sophisticated users would think had been erased," Freeh explained. Most computers sold in 1998 featured hard drives of six to eight GB capacity. But by the end of this year, sixty to eighty GB hard drives will be common, he noted -- and with considerable exaggeration, we observe. To tell the truth, twenty to forty GB hard drives will be "common" towards the end of this year. Sixty to eighty... well, that will remain in the realm of "dream boxes" for some time to come. In any event, the continuing development of big HDDs "vastly increases the area that needs to be searched", he complained. Yet there is hope on the horizon. The FBI has developed a program it calls the Automated Computer Examination System (ACES), which allows investigators to examine huge areas of magnetic media quickly, Freeh revealed. This, combined with the FBI's Computer Wizards' ambition to "de-centralise computer examination," should eventually yield an efficient mechanism for lifting data from confiscated boxes, he reckons. One putatively successful effort along these lines is a collaboration between the FBI and the San Diego Regional Computer Forensics Laboratory. This de-centralised approach is supposed to increase the Bureau's efficiency in forensic investigation. New centres are planned for New England and Texas, and ought to be running soon, Freeh said. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Sorry London, Europe's top tech city is Munich
New 'Atlas of ICT Activity' finds innovation isn't happening at Silicon Roundabout
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.