Feeds

DVD industry is “screwing customers” – Torvalds

Linux guru lashes out at the entertainment establishment....gently, of course

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

The DVD industry is motivated by fear to maintain control of their technology, which at the moment is not available to Linux users from any licensed source, Linus Torvalds claimed at the LinuxWorld Expo Wednesday morning. In an obvious set-up following Torvalds' keynote address, an audience member asked, "I have Linux on my laptop, and I'd like to play DVDs on it. What have you got to say about that?" In reply, Torvalds stated with uncharacteristic bluntness that the DVD industry is willing to "screw its customers." The industry "wants control" more than anything else, he added. "Some companies just can't let go -- they need to maintain control," Torvalds said. He added that he hoped the DVD consortium would lose its lawsuit, filed recently against several Web sites where a crack to disable a security feature had been posted. The DVD security crack, developed by Norwegian teenager Jon Johansen, would enable Linux users to play DVDs with an unauthorised media player. Johansen and his sympathisers insist that the crack was developed solely for that purpose, but the industry, represented by the powerful Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), says it would enable easy pirating of content via Internet downloads. Critics have pointed out that bandwidth charges would make any such pirating scheme unprofitable, but the industry insists that the threat is real. The case is being tried in the USA, in both New York and California simultaneously. And if the DVD consortium should prevail in court, Torvalds said he hoped that "some commercial company" would license the technology and develop a media player compatible with the Linux operating system. We can't help noting that if the MPAA had devoted half as much energy to outfitting a vendor for a licensed Linux DVD player as it has squandered on pursuing lawsuits against those who have taken the matter into their own hands, this legal entanglemant would probably not have been necessary. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.