Feeds

MS enforces Win2k TS licensing via Web ‘Clearinghouse’

Makes sure Terminal Services users have all paid the licence fee

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

A new, largely unnoticed feature of Windows 2000 takes control of client licensing out of the hands of network administrators, and transfers it to Microsoft. The new system only applies to client licensing within Terminal Services for Windows 2000, but as Microsoft gets deeper into the application rental/services business, it provides a glimpse of the shape of Microsoft licensing to come. Terminal Services for Win2k includes Terminal Services License Management (TSLM), which is a mechanism for ensuring that any device initiating a Win2k Terminal Services session has a Win2k licence or a CAL (Client Access License). This is the case for non-Microsoft clients as well as for Microsoft ones. As Microsoft puts it, prior to Win2k "management and assignment of CALs was left up to the system administrator, which led to the difficult problem of tracking purchased CALs against deployed devices." Microsoft is therefore making it easier for administrators by relieving them of this irksome burden, and automating it through the grandly-titled Microsoft Certificate Authority & License Clearinghouse. We can't help noting, however, that system administrators still have to deal with CAL-tracking in non-Terminal Services scenarios - for now? It works like this. Win2k Terminal Services uses a licensing wizard to access the Clearinghouse. The Clearinghouse can also be contacted via the Internet, by fax or by phone. Says Microsoft: "The Clearinghouse stores information about all activated licence servers and client licence key packs that have been issued, manages authentication, and validates purchased CALs." It works with a licence server, which is a server with Terminal Services Licensing enabled, at the customer end. This stores and tracks issued licences. The impact of the licence server on the network is described as "minimal," but although it can co-reside on the Terminal server, "In most large systems, the licence server will be deployed on a separate server." Although this system currently applies only to Terminal Services for Win2k, Microsoft is moving in a similar direction with its new licensing model for Win2k server in general. Citing customer demand, Microsoft says it has simplified the Win2k CAL system by "creating a new licensing model based on authenticated use." This is intended to produce licences "that recognise the move towards Web-based applications and services." And it's also Microsoft-speak for maximising the number of clients that have to pay up in order to use Microsoft network services. Microsoft puts forward two scenarios where customers may have to buy more CALs than they needed under NT 4.0. Customers whose applications use Win2k authentication or directory credentials will need CALs for them, while Internet sites using Win2k authentication will also need CALs. This does not apply to vanilla Web servers - access to Internet sites by anonymous users does not require a CAL. As an alternative to buying individual CALs for Internet sites using Win2k authentication, Microsoft has also introduced an Internet Connector licence. This allows unlimited numbers of authenticated users to access a single Win2k server, costs $1,999, and you need one for each server accessed. It should not be confused with the existing Internet Connector licence for Terminal Server, which allows 200 concurrent connections to Terminal Server via "anonymous connections from non-employees." ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?
Compulsory code schools, luvvies love it, but what about Maths and Physics?
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.