MS unveils Win2K anti-piracy tools

Look out fellas, they've got stickers on 'em

Microsoft outlined the anti-piracy measures for its Windows 2000 Professional operating system today at the Computer Trade Show in Birmingham. The US giant, which let copies of the software loose into the OEM channel on Monday in readiness for next month's launch, has added a couple of natty little features to try and foil the counterfeiters. Firstly, it claims the CD media - which will only be available through the distribution channel and not to direct buyers - is very difficult to copy because it is entirely hologrammed. The company will also be shipping a hologrammed authenticity sticker with the product name and code of the machine with every copy of the software. PC sellers will be told to stick one on the outside of every PC shipped to prove the software is genuine. "The sticker will give users visible proof of authenticity," said Des O'Carroll, Microsoft OEM channel sales manager. "It will also help system builders selling genuine software to justify their machine pricing." Carroll also claimed this would educate users into understanding that it was illegal to make multiple copies of software. Microsoft has announced an introductory offer for the channel of seven copies of Professional for the price of six. However, the company was criticised by resellers over its lack of plans to explain to customers that the sticker and hologrammed CD were necessary to ensure the OS was legal. Carroll said Microsoft would not be running any advertising campaigns to tell customers of the changes. Educating users will be left to the channel. ® See also: Win2K pains Pete Sherriff Microsoft fudges Win2K speed trials

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