Feeds

MS and friends plan London City of Future on Dome site

Consortium plans to take punters for biggest ride in Europe

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

Microsoft is involved in one of the bids to find a role for the UK's world-famous Millennium Dome - but not, apparently, with Microsoft money. The UK government is planning to get itself shot of structure, built to celebrate the Millennium and now shaping up to be something of a Big Flop, at the end of this year, and has shortlisted six proposals for its future. Remarkably, having tapped private finance to get the world's best New Year party (government spinmeister) or London's biggest white elephant (London mayoral candidate Susan Kramer) built, the government is proposing to tap it again to find a role for the thing in the future. The bid Microsoft is involved in is for, uh-oh, the City of the Future. The money for this bids is coming from South African property and leisure group Monex and UK real estate outfit MEPC, while Microsoft, Nortel, Cisco, 3Com, construction group Laing and brewery, catering and leisure group Whitbread. You can see the tech-heavy bent of this consortium's bid pretty clearly. If it's accepted, they'll be building a 120-acre technology theme park with the Dome at its centre, and the largest covered water features and rides in Europe. Presumably there'll be some seriously networked technology in there as well, so that the backers can strut their stuff, but we all know what geeks really like. A cursory look at the Microsoft UK Web site meanwhile reveals that Whitbread, in addition to coming in handy for supplying the punters with large quantities of beer, food and sundry skittles, might just be a Microsoft trusty. It's running Microsoft SQL-based systems for its outlets, which means the EPOS systems in a City of the Future Dome could turn out to be NT workstations (no, these really do exist, honest), and Whitbread retail architect John Michell turns out to be chairman of Microsoft's European Customer Advisory Board. One possible snag with the bid, of course, is that presumably the actual product will be expected to ship reasonably soon after the current raging success/desperate white elephant-meisters up sticks on 31 December 2000. This could be a problem. Register scary fact: Register uberspinmeister Drew Cullen says he took the kids to the Dome and it was great. He'll be telling us he paid next. ®

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
Hey, Scots. Microsoft's Bing thinks you'll vote NO to independence
World's top Google-finding website calls it for the UK
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Apple CEO Tim Cook: TV is TERRIBLE and stuck in the 1970s
The iKing thinks telly is far too fiddly and ugly – basically, iTunes
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
OECD lashes out at tax avoiding globocorps' location-flipping antics
You hear that, Amazon, Google, Microsoft et al?
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.