Feeds

Hollywood big-guns take aim at three Webmasters

Even this kind of intimidation may fail to protect on-line copyrights

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Three New York men are being sued in federal court for allegedly distributing software which decodes the copyright protection of DVD disks, and allows their contents to be downloaded onto a computer's hard disk. This would enable virtually anyone with an online computer to distribute a DVD's content worldwide via the Internet. Eight Hollywood studios, Universal, Paramount, MGM, Tristar, Columbia, Time Warner, Disney and 20th Century Fox have teamed up to file the suit against the three New Yorkers, Shawn Reimerdes, Eric Corley and Roman Kazan. "This is a case of theft," according to Motion Picture Association of America President Jack Valenti. "The posting of the de-encryption formula is no different from making and then distributing unauthorised keys to a department store." Well, it's a lot different, actually, as it involves neither trespassing, nor any potential for causing personal injury or property damage, nor any theft of an original, physical copy of the disputed intellectual property. In truth, it's no different from making copies of a video or audio cassette, which is legal in the USA if done for personal convenience and not for profit, though the potential here for profiteers to re-distribute copyrighted content worldwide over the Internet makes it understandably frightening to anyone in the entertainment industry. Valenti's hysterical overstatement speaks to a fundamental weakness in the entertainment industry's relationship with the Internet. As much as it wants to distribute its wares in the over-hyped "electronic marketplace", it has to be terrified of the very technology it seeks to exploit. There is no other medium which offers anything approaching the Net's potential for distributing vast reams of bootleg audio and video files worldwide. It is because the Net's capacity to simplify and facilitate bootlegging is so immense and so uncontrollable that the entertainment industry has been so churlish about protecting its copyrights. Various industry front groups, including the Motion Picture Association, have issued numerous threatening rants about their ambitions to tighten on-line copyright protections. To date, their efforts -- both technical and legislative -- have been hopelessly ineffective, owing to the very flexibility and anonymity built in to the Net and the technology by which their products are recorded. Because of the superstitious faith with which technology is usually venerated, it is unthinkable to most that something like the Internet might not be advantageous to all people for all purposes. Any heretical points of view suggesting that this might not be the case will have to settle in gradually, one instance at a time, as experience contradicts imagination. Film and music are two instances where that settling in seems likely to occur sooner rather than later. If the entertainment industry were to take a hard, adult look at what it can reasonably accomplish in protecting its products from mass, on-line redistribution, it might just conclude that such products, taken as a species, simply don't belong on the Internet. ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
It may be ILLEGAL to run Heartbleed health checks – IT lawyer
Do the right thing, earn up to 10 years in clink
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.