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Microsoft Year 2000 fails to impress

New product doesn't live up to hype

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The long-awaited launch of Microsoft Year 2000(tm) turned out to be a damp squib, according to most industry watchers. Despite a development spend of well over $3Bn and an intensive, five-year marketing campaign; MSY2K has failed to live up to expectations. The feature list for the new product included aircraft falling from the sky, worldwide thermonuclear war, unfeasibly large gas bills and a return to a feudal society. "There are always problems with the first release of a major new product, said a Microsoft spin paramedic. "We confidently expect a full feature set in the next release, Year 2000.1, but there will also be a service pack available later in Q1. However, we are proud to have delivered on time, even if the product doesn't yet function as advertised." "Once again we see a Microsoft product rushed to market to meet its launch deadline," said a Sun spokesman who requested anonymity. "The world must have learned by now that Microsoft seems incapable of launching a fully functional product," he added through clenched, gleaming teeth. "This is a vindication of what we have been saying all along," said several thousand Linux supporters on bulletin boards around the world. Linux is the operating system that delivers: "the Linux Today servers failed for five minutes precisely at 00:00 UTC on the new year, depriving Linux news readers worldwide of their accustomed headlines". Intel was perhaps the most disappointed of Microsoft's strategic partners. MSY2K was designed in part to help the development of new, high-performance, bug-free chipsets, but this functionality is not now expected to be included until the launch next year of MSY2.1K. In the meantime, thousands of highly-paid Y2K consultants are looking forward to receiving huge wads of cash for doing absolutely nothing. ® Linux Today: Y2K Bug Strikes Down Linux Today

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