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Intel CuMine chips pre-announced, pre-announced again

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We knew for some time that Intel would talk about a 800MHz processor on Monday, and for a longer time yet that it had two 750MHz Pentium IIIs and some other Coppermines in its pipeline. But now due to the awesome power of the Web, a customer of another news service (Reuters) seems to have completed the parts of the jigsaw by accidentally posting a story meant for Monday's newspapers, late yesterday. According to the piece, Intel will say it is actually shipping 800MHz Pentium III Coppermines, but only one or two will launch machines, which are unlikely to arrive for another 30 days at least. Dell is likely to announce (shurely pre-announce, Ed) the 800MHz Pentium III, but it will be some time before people will get their mitts on them. Last week we reported that many original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) would only get limited samples of the 800MHz Pentium III on Monday next. The 800MHz Coppermine will cost $850/1000, while the 750MHz parts will cost $800/1000, according to Reuters. It's still pretty hard to get hold of the 733MHz Pentium III Coppermine parts that Intel pre-announced on October 25th. It's clear that Intel has brought forward the date of the 800MHz and 750MHz announcements because it was caught hopping after AMD managed to produce 750MHz Athlon chips faster than expected. And very reliable sources continue to tell us that AMD can roll out 1GHz processors as early as January, if it wants to. For full details of the Monday announcements, see the links to our much earlier stories, below. And if you want to see just how on earth major news organisations operate, check out the release from Reuters (Hoovers) and the embargo details top of the document. Grab it quick before someone realises the cock-up, and pulls it pronto. The Register does its best to obtain information about forward plans of companies by contacts within the industry, who are often willing to talk provided they are not named. If they were named, and because they nearly always sign non-disclosure agreements (NDAs), they would get in big, big trouble. We call these sources, reliable sources, and highly reliable sources... ® See also Intel NDA found on floor Intel will sample 800MHz Pentium IIIs next Monday Intel will cut Coppermine prices earlier than expected Intel to intro 750MHz CuMine January 10th

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