Feeds

New challenger enters Bill Gates domain sale ring

Tongue-in-cheek (we presume) three year old cybersquatter will take £1.5 million

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

Following swiftly on from the weekend's ludicrously over-hyped billgates.com 'sale' (see story) Register readers were quick to point out that prestige vanity sites seem to be ten a penny, and not always of the slightest concern to the owners of the name they're using. Writes one: "My three year old son, Earl, owns the domain www.bill-gates.co.uk. He hasn't decided what to do with it yet, but I'm sure he would be interested in a price war with the owners of billgates.co.uk. Yep, I've just spoken to him and he will take a mill and a half if it helps get the deal done. Canny lad, that one." Regrettably we fear Earl would be advised not to hold his breath on this one, but under the circs, perhaps it would be a kind gesture if His Billness, or even his representatives on earth at MS UK, could see their way to putting a small sum in Earl's building society account and shipping him a Nintendo. Mail us, Microserfs, and we'll pass on any offers. Meanwhile we've also been alerted to the existence of stevejobs.co.uk, which is registered under the relative anonymity of "Dan H," and which mysteriously points to microsoft.com. This isn't necessarily a Microsoft plot, we should point out - poor old MS can't help it if people point at them for satirical purposes. The moral of the tale is of course (and we're sorry to have to break this to you, Earl) that although the odd domain might turn out to be worth a packet, this is usually because somebody screwed-up on branding and registration (hello, Alta Vista, for example). The only point to having a domain called Bill Gates is if you are Bill Gates, so it's only ever going to be worth whatever Bill Gates thinks it's worth. As his Web site is at www.microsoft.com/billgates/ that suggests he doesn't think it's worth anything. And domains that are similar to big, established domains are of dubious value too - you can only profit from them by pretending to be the big domain, which is then going to sue you, right? ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.