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Intel moves 800MHz Coppermine launch forward

And the 750MHz part it planned for next month

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A report on Electronic Buyers' News said that Intel has moved the launch of its 750MHz Pentium IIIs up from next January to next week, and will also introduce a 800MHz Coppermine Pentium III. If the reports are correct, it suggests that Intel is moving faster than expected to narrow the distance between it and its nearest competitor AMD, which introduced a 750MHz Athlon a few weeks back. According to EBN, the other products Intel was planning to introduce next January, including new mobile Coppermine chips and Celeron parts, are still being held until that date. The report also states that there will be both 133MHz and 100MHz versions of the 750MHz parts. Last Sunday, Intel cut prices on some of its Coppermine Pentium IIIs and Pentium III Xeons by between four to seven per cent. Intel never comments on unannounced products to the press, so we'll just have to wait a week to see what's afoot. ®

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