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Rambus Ink confirms big game deal

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Buy One or two of our long-time readers were rather surprised when we ran a story a couple of days back suggesting that Rambus Ink, maker of fast memory, was undervalued. We said that the introduction of the Sony PlayStation II was sure to give the company a fillip, regardless of whether or not it was worth stuffing RIMMs into Intel i820 or i840 motherboards. Needless to say, the share price of Rambus Ink fell after our buy recommendation, showing that punters prefer to ignore our advice. Yesterday, Rambus closed at $68 and a bit. Now Geoff Tate, CEO of Rambus Ink, has confirmed to local newspaper The Wall Street Journal that its business will indeed get a boost when PlayStation II uses its technology. Rambus will announce the fact it will support the PlayStation II and other platforms later on today. Tate also told the WSJ that it would extend its markets into routers and switches too, and announced a slight re-shuffle in management. As we correctly predicted two days ago, the chips will start shipping in PlayStations, in volume in spring of next year. In summer, against all indications from Wall Street financial analysts, we said AMD and Compaq stock was undervalued. And, sure enough, they were. So, because we've reiterated that Rambus is undervalued, watch its share price continue to fall on Wall Street, and if you're smart, buy accordingly. One reader on our bulletin board recently commented: "Hey, The Register. Thank you for the poop on semi-conductors. By daily reading of The Register I bought AMD and sold Intel ahead of the crowd. In fact, my rate of return has tripled since I began reading The Register 12 months ago. Nothing like "inside information." ® See also Rambus Ink has brilliant future AMD thoroughly undervalued

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