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Intel PSN no threat to personal freedom

The Hell it isn't

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So Intel faces yet another threatened blockade on those pesky Pentium IIIs with their evil Processor Serial Numbers, does it? Give us strength. The STOA (scientific and technological options assessment) committee is presenting its findings to the European Parliament, in connection with the development of surveillance technology and the risk of abuse of economic information. According to the report, there is a prima facie case that the PSN breaches European protocols on security and recommends close examination of the role of both the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the National Security Agency (NSA), in relation to the Pentium III's embedded security number. How many times do we have to repeat that PSN is a number given to a piece of hardware, not a person. There is no way the CIA, the FSB (what used to be called the KGB) or even Intel's Thought Police can identify who is using a PC from its PSN. Look, if PSN could be used to keep tabs on dissidents and scumsucking journalists, why the Hell doesn't the Chinese government want anybody to have a PIII? Sounds like just the kind of tool for a paranoid administration to encourage. Back in May we challenged the personal freedom geeks to locate the P3 with the serial number 00000672000226FA025D71BF and tell us who was using it and what they were looking at. That machine is still connected to the Web for an average of eight hours a day and not a single person, paramilitary organisation or alien death squad from the planet Tharg has got in touch. Oh, and one question for the EU before it announces a ban on Mad Chip Disease - what is it planning to do about the millions of P3s already shipped? It sure as Hell can't locate them by PSN. ® Think it's time to beat up on The Sherriff again, or want to hand him a bouquet of pretty flowers? Either way, email him here. He feels strongly on this one... See also Intel faces possible Euro block on Pentium IIIs China says no to Pentium IIIs, chip IDs and Win 98

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