Feeds

ASA slaps Virgin for offensive ad

Watchdog bares teeth, snarls at IT adverts

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

An advertising leaflet written in blood by Virgin Interactive Entertainment gave the ASA something to get its teeth into this month. Virgin sent out an unsolicited mailing for a computer game in an envelope with four bullet holes on the front and holes surrounded by blood on the back. It contained a letter, a CD, and a smaller blood stained envelope that said: "Post dis F**Ker now". It also contained a Polaroid-style photo showing a man shot dead with the words "You're next" written in blood. The copy said: "Violent, Ruthless, Cunning? You’d better be... It ain't no place to f**k around... it ain't no f**king picnic... So come on ***hole...", etc. You get the idea. The ASA dubbed the mailing "irresponsible and likely to cause serious or widespread offence". Another company that got into trouble over language this month was Vodafone. The telecomms company claimed it had "the widest global mobile network". By this, it said it meant the widest coverage. However, BT Cellnet questioned the statement, and the ASA ruled that customers would interpret the claim as meaning the number of countries they could use their mobiles in, not overall coverage. IT companies also came under scrutiny. Hewlett Packard claimed to have brought out the first colour printer to flash up on a PC screen when the cartridge needed changing. Saatchi & Saatchi challenged the claim, saying Epson already had the function on its Stylus Color 600 inkjet printer. The ASA said that although HP's 2000C printer was unique and told users when ink was getting low, it was not the only printer to flash up an icon on screen and therefore the statement was misleading. Computer Warehouse got into trouble for quoting prices without including VAT. Although its advert was aimed at business customers in a specialist magazine, the ASA said that private consumers could also read the advert. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.