Feeds

Win95 development head Silverberg leaves MS

It's taken him something like two years to get into the office to resign, apparently...

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Mobile application security vulnerability report

So it's finally farewell again, Brad Silverberg, combative street fighter and Microsoft executive, who as a senior VP led the development of Windows 95. He will be resigning tomorrow after a very extended leave. He had been a consultant to Microsoft, advising on its consumer strategy. The arrival of Rick Belluzzo from SGI has apparently convinced him that "his help was no longer needed" although there is no evidence that he is overly sore about this, since some time back he had turned down the job of heading the interactive media group, i.e. what turned into Belluzzo's job. Silverberg often was the front man when Microsoft was being criticised. He was in charge of the Windows 95 delays ("If we're not perfect at scheduling, we apologise" and OS/2 "was a cheap imitation of [Windows 95]"). He disliked OS/2 with a passion, once claiming that Sprint was deploying Windows 95 beta in a mission-critical production environment, but this turned out to be a three-PC deployment where there were 1,300 PCs running OS/2. Intel also had a somewhat negative view of him, it came out in the trial: he was "incredibly arrogant... dangerous... extremely hostile... the guy hates us... pent-up anger... impossible to deal with." Silverberg came from Borland and joined Microsoft in 1989. He later spearheaded Microsoft's first efforts at luring away key Borland staff to Microsoft, offering a $3 million signing-on bonus for Anders Hejlsberg, the chief architect of Delphi, plus $200,000 salary and 75,000 shares. Paul Gross, then VP of research at Borland, was only given a $1 million signing-on bonus, apparently. When Microsoft included the DR-DOS trap in Windows 3.1, it was Silverberg who tried to imply that the compatibility problems had been with DR-DOS, rather than deliberately engineered by Microsoft. It was also Silverberg who announced Windows 95 sales to much incredulity in late 1995: his figures did not square with Microsoft's supposed accounting principles. When Microsoft was caught red-handed with Apple QuickTime code in its Video for Windows developers kit, he claimed that "The licensed code is low-level driver code" but did not explain why it just so happened that it improved Microsoft's video performance dramatically. Nor was the code licensed from Apple, of course. Clearly, he's vested. ®

The Power of One Brief: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

More from The Register

next story
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Amazon Reveals One Weird Trick: A Loss On Almost $20bn In Sales
Investors really hate it: Share price plunge as growth SLOWS in key AWS division
Bose says today is F*** With Dre Day: Beats sued in patent battle
Music gear giant seeks some of that sweet, sweet Apple pie
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
Too many IT conferences to cover? MICROSOFT to the RESCUE!
Yet more word of cuts emerges from Redmond
Chips are down at Broadcom: Thousands of workers laid off
Cellphone baseband device biz shuttered
Twitch rich as Google flicks $1bn hitch switch, claims snitch
Gameplay streaming biz and search king refuse to deny fresh gobble rumors
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.