Feeds

Huge shortages, technical problems hit Intel Coppermine debut

Mobile PIIIs delayed, heat sink problem with S370s

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

Internal Intel documents have revealed a massive shortage of Coppermine parts, just a day after Chipzilla beat its chest to the world's press, and bellowed: "Look how well I've done". The mobile Pentium III is in particularly short supply, with distributors and dealers being told that boxed units are now unlikely to arrive in volume until Q1 of 2000, with availability still very limited in Q4. A letter we have seen said: "Currently there is a limited supply of mobile Pentium III processors. Initial orders of mobile Pentium III processors on 0.18 micron technology were higher than forecasted. Intel expects to have ample capacity in 1H'00. Owing to this situation, Intel is planning to introduce the boxed mobile Pentium III processor in Q1'00." But it's not just mobile Coppermines that are in short supply. The S370 500E and 550E processors are also unavailable, meaning that Intel has pulled the plug on all of its marketing plans for these products. The problem here is with validation of the fan heatsink, according to documents we have seen. It means that the S370 Pentium IIIs may now well be delayed until the beginning of December, or later. Intel also pulled the plug on its "early access" plan for distributors and dealers, under which they can buy up to three new processors ahead of launch. In this case, the Pentium III 733s, 700s, 667s, 650s, 600EBs, 600Es, and 533s in the SECC2 package were all affected. The move is a further grave embarrassment for Intel in the wake of the i820 Caminogate debacle, and prompts the question of whether Intel really was ready to ship product, or whether it was just a marchitectural move to try to scupper AMD's successful intro of the Athlonium. At the Intel Developer Forum in September, CEO Craig Barrett said that he had ordered his staff to produce Coppermines and 7xx chips early. ® Related stories Intel Coppermine chips: now the goldmine is official... Bug in 733MHz Coppermine? No one has stocks anyway... Consumers face PC confusion post-Coppermine launch

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Why Oracle CEO Larry Ellison had to go ... Except he hasn't
Silicon Valley's veteran seadog in piratical Putin impression
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.