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Intel i820 update leaks

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An internal Intel slide has revealed more details about the Rambus memory problem which scuttled the launch of the i820 Camino chipset, causing angry flushed faces at Chipzilla Central. And an Intel customer, who does not wish to be named, has now told us that he is expecting his two-RIMM mobos to arrive in late November. Another Intel customer says that the embarrassment is even greater because its Cape Cod mobo -- which uses SDRAM is ready to roll and works perfectly, but the company will not release it until its so-called flagship mobo, the Rambus-based Vancouver, is ready to roll. Sources close to Intel's plans add that it is under enormous pressure to ship the i820 mobo this year, otherwise it will lose enormous face both with Rambus Ink and the other six members of the Seven Dramurai. Kyle Bennett, over at HardOCP emailed us a copy of the Intel slide which makes interesting reading. As we reported earlier this week, the i840 chipset has no such Rambus problems, and that has prompted speculation that Intel may create an i840 lite for the desktop market. According to the slide, entitled Intel 840/820 Status Update W42.1, the i840 remains on target for W44 (that's next week, for us mere mortals on the planet earth). It states that for the i840 chipset, the final PTQ decision (whatever that is), considers a core kit only, comprising the MCH, the IHL, and the FWH. Decision on the P64H bridge technology, MRH-R and MRH-S will made at a later date. Intel now claims in the slide that it has identified the root cause of the memory errors. Its preliminary validation including simulation data on 2 RIMM only designs shows no failures, the slide says. But there is no launch date yet set, it adds. (In Intel speak, that's POR = plan of record). It adds that testing of the two RIMM design is the number one priority, and that Validation results now show that 2+2 RDRAM designs exhibit memory channel errors similar to those seen with 3RIMM designs. The PCG (that's the Platform Component Group in Intelspeak), is recommending a 0+2 design as the "time to market a MTH/SDRAM" solution. The PCG is providing a technical update in W43 -- err, that's this week. ® See also Camino egg on face to be wiped away by i840? Intel's i840 is a chipset that works Satan's little helpers get hammers out to i820 mobos

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