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Intel Coppermine mobiles: we got the prices

Meanwhile Geyserville has a name-change...

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Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Informed sources have now confirmed the introduction of two high-end Coppermine mobile parts which will arrive at the same time as Intel launches its desktop and Xeon versions of the .18 micron technology. The 450MHz Pentium III/mobiles will cost $360 each when bought in boxes of 10, and $350 each when bought in boxes of 100. The 500MHz Coppermine Pentium III/mobile will command a price of $545 when bought in units of 10, and $535 when bought in units of 100. Both come with 256K cache. The introduction of these parts spells the real beginning of a shift away from .25 micron process technology to a situation where Intel's processors will eventually all have a smaller die size, and run cooler and faster. Joe D'Elia, senior microprocessor analyst at Dataquest Europe, said the introduction of .18 Coppermine is important because it shows that Intel is continuing to move forward on a technology front. He said: "Coppermine allows Intel to incorporate other new technologies, not necessarily on the CPU front, and will help them with [the introduction of] Willamette." On the mobile front, D'Elia said that the most important development will be when Intel introduces its Geyserville technology next year. That will allow notebook PCs to perform like desktop machines. D'Elia said there would be a period where older chips and newer Intel processors overlapped, but he expected that will last for a relatively short time. And reliable information we have received is that Intel will call Geyserville SpeedStep. ® See also Coppermine: we got the prices Pentium III/mobile .18 micron to arrive fall What the Hell is...Geyserville?

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