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Updated A top US IT company has been unknowingly hosting a Danish pornographic Web site containing a clutch of sordid sex scenes. The hardcore material was discovered on one of the servers belonging to AOpen Inc -- the world’s largest motherboard and PC components manufacturer and part of the $7 billion Acer group, of Taiwan. Fourteen pictures depicting images of extreme depravity -- some involving teenage girls -- were discovered on one of the company's US FTP servers. Although officials at the company knew nothing of the porn material it is apparent that its security has been breached somewhere along the line. The company has been swift to remove the offending material. Less than an hour after The Register contacted AOpen to alert it to the problem, technicians at the Taiwan-based company swung into action to remove all the offending files. At the moment it's unclear whether the porn site was the result of someone hacking into AOpen's FTP server or whether it was perpetrated by an employee. Not surprisingly, the company has launched an investigation into the matter and is adamant it will get to the root of the problem. In a statement Loes de Vlaam, marketing manager at AOpen in Holland, said: "AOpen dearly regrets the fact that somebody seemed to have found access to our ftp server and posted some images that AOpen definitely [disapproves of]. "We have removed the images and are starting an investigation on how this was possible to have happened. "As soon as the method has been discovered we will make sure this will no longer be possible in the future. The site, called "Martin's hjemmeside" was crudely put together and displayed little flair for design. The Register has so far been unable to translate a large chunk of text which it believes could shed some light on the great Dane, Martin but a copy of the text can be found here. ®

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