Feeds

Teledesic to launch sooner than expected

Satellite company admits it's looking at early entries to market to avoid 'Iridium Syndrome'

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

Satellite-based Internet pipeline company Teledesic yesterday coughed up to charges made by the Wall Street Journal that it was "exploring early market entry strategies". Some confession. It would be surprising indeed if the $9 billion Teledesic wasn't looking at ways of getting customers on board sooner rather than later to fund the full development of the service. It would also allow it to build up a userbase in time for the opening of the complete satellite network. It's always easier to win new business if you've already got users on board, than it is gaining customers from scratch. Of course, the snag is that Teledesic might suffer from Iridium Syndrome -- failing to achieve userbase targets because the technology simply isn't ready yet or powerful enough -- but the company's co-CEO, Bill Owens, reckons that's not going to be an issue. In what's almost certainly a tacit nod towards Iridium, Owens said: "Despite current conditions in the satellite communications market, Teledesic is in an enviable position." How does Owens define 'enviable'? "We have money in the bank. We have the time necessary to evaluate opportunities created by the unfortunate difficulties of others [see what we mean?]. We have investors with long-term vision." The company's key investors, apart from Owens himself, are Bill Gates, Motorola, Boeing and Alwaleed Bin Talal, the Saudi Arabian prince noted for his keen interest in hi-tech investments. Of course, Owens hasn't said what kinds of "early market entry strategies" he's considering, but they're likely to centre on offerings like point-to-point network connections for big businesses, something to make use of the infrastructure the company has while it builds up the rest. ® Related Story Teledesic confirms Motorola support

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
It may be ILLEGAL to run Heartbleed health checks – IT lawyer
Do the right thing, earn up to 10 years in clink
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.