Feeds

Cam in no 820, your time is up

Wasn't it supposed to have four memory slots, History Man Pete Sherriff writes

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Oh dear, it's almost enough to make you feel sorry for poor old Chipzilla. Betting the farm on the whizz-bang i820 chipset and Rambus is starting to look like being a really bad move for the Great Satan of Chips. The inability of the 820 to run correctly on mobos with three memory slots is embarrassing enough, but those with longer memories will recall that back in April The Register ran the very first 'What the Hell is...' feature, explaining what Camino was all about. Even then, Camino was late. The original spec for the 820 mentions not three, but four memory slots, so it looks very much as if Intel discovered a problem with four slot configurations months ago and quietly cut back the spec to just three, hoping the problem would go away. Now Chipsetzilla is whimpering on about a measly two memory slots -- and that just isn't enough for the high-end systems the 820 was supposed to support. There are a number of fundamental differences between the way Camino works (or rather, doesn't work) and conventional chipsets like the trusty BX440, which could explain where the problems lie. Camino is based on a hub architecture with a Memory Controller Hub (MCH) at its heart. The MCH in turn talks to the CPU through the host bus (at 133MHz), the graphics subsystem through the AGP bus (AGP 4X) and the memory through Rambus. Everything else is handled by the I/O Controller Hub (ICH) which has a direct link to the MCH. Unlike regular memory, you need to fit continuity modules in empty memory slots because Rambus daisy chains its memory a bit like SCSI devices. This was supposed to mean that clocking the memory was simpler and was also electrically superior, offering active power management of individual memory modules. Electrically superior it may be, but if it doesn't work reliably, it's totally useless. It looks as if Intel was overreaching itself by trying to introduce so many new techniques simultaneously. ® Related stories What the hell is... Camino and Rambus all about Intel comes clean over i820 delay i820 derailed as Intel goes Rambust UK system builder in a right Mesh over i820 delay

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?
Compulsory code schools, luvvies love it, but what about Maths and Physics?
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.