Feeds

Torvalds sees Windows decline, rise of Linux appliance

And software prices will crash, within three years

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

While Steve Ballmer was causing stock prices to crash in the USA (String him up!), Linus Torvalds seems to have been coincidentally making related predictions in Helsinki. Software prices, he said, will start to fall drastically, with the crunch coming in around three years. Torvalds was talking to the determined Reuters reporter who induced him to say nothing much about Transmeta earlier in the day (See story), and although he doesn't seem to have said a great deal in the interview either, he tossed in a couple of intriguing hints as to how he sees the future. The 'software price crash in three years' prediction, for example, is based on a decline in the need for constant upgrades. It would have been useful if he could have elaborated on this, but this was most likely a dig at Microsoft, Intel and the PC companies. Wintel especially has a need to keep the upgrades rolling fast in order to keep the revenue rolling, and they're constantly searching (Intel blatantly so) for new applications that can soak up the excess horsepower they need to sell to their customers. It's no coincidence that although Torvalds also thinks that Linux could break Windows' dominance on the desktop, he suggests that it would be best to review the situation again in three years time. That implies that he sees the growth of Linux on the desktop as taking place in parallel to a decline in the effectiveness of the Wintel upgrade/sales model. Which is a reasonable point of view, but he's more concerned with getting Linux onto smaller "purpose-built devices" such as phones and PDAs, and envisages multiple devices going into the home. So he's obviously keen on developing Linux in the embedded space, and making it more appropriate for a broad range of cheap, single- or limited-purpose appliances. The action, he suggests, will shift away from the desktop anyway, and the implication is that Windows will be the loser. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.