IT sector puts pressure on Taiwan gov to get power supplies back

Industry narrowly avoids having to wait weeks to get electricity reconnected

The Taiwanese authorities have come under pressure from the island's IT community to rethink its priorities when reconnecting power supplies. Initially, the government said that public authorities, government offices and domestic households would be the first to be reconnected, with the island's businesses facing a wait of "several weeks", according to Taiwan-based EuroTrade. Such was the uproar created by this announcement, that the government has U-turned on its earlier decision. TSMC, the island's largest silicon foundry, has now begun its clean-up operation, with around ten per cent of its power supplies back on. But it will be weeks before anything approaching normal production is restored. According to EuroTrade, TSMC has said it will be at least one week after power supplies return to normal before it can resume full production. In the meantime, it -- and others in the same position -- is working on testing and re-calibrating its machinery. Since the earthquake struck, TSMC has raised around $8.25 million for disaster relief funds, with employees of the company contributing 20 per cent of their September salaries. One of Taiwan's major motherboard makers, Abit, has said it anticipates being back in full production within one week and that it suffered only minor damage in the quake. UK-based 3D and multimedia reseller 3DSL, has compiled a list of major equipment producers effected by the earthquake. To view the 3DSL article and the list, click here. ®

Sponsored: Today’s most dangerous security threats