Feeds

Nokia unveils Linux broadband wireless Web system

And the killer is that it sounds like it could work, and is shippable RSN...

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

Nokia may be a fully paid-up member of Symbian, but the company's multimedia operation seems to be putting its eggs in the Linux basket instead. In the past few days Nokia Multimedia Terminals (set-top boxes et al has been talking about a Linux-based prototype mobile digital TV and cellular convergence product. On the one hand you could think of it as a crock, on the other as a plausible sounding compromise product that could fill the gap nicely until broadband multimedia is being fired at us from all directions via wireless. The MediaScreen uses digital TV broadcast to send out data, and wireless comms for the return signal. Its base OS is Linux, it uses Mozilla as its browser, and in current form it comes in a tablet-type format. It's a pretty obvious variant on the satellite broadcast/DSL approach, given that what's sent from the local machine to the server is usually a lot smaller than what comes in the other direction. That's previously led to systems where data is broadcast from server to client, and a land-line is used in the other direction, but GSM wireless is perfectly viable to perform the latter role, and Nokia's system could conceivably give us broadband wireless Internet well ahead of the deployment of 3G wireless services. And the absolute genius of this implementation is that Digital TV is coming with a momentum all of its own, and digital cellular is here already - all of the infrastructure will be there for whenever it goes live. Nokia Multimedia CTO Helmut Stein is apparently shooting for the big time with this combo. It'll work in the home in a combination GSM phone, set-top box and home control system (people don't want more wires in the home), but it'll work in the car as well. Obviously, it's going to have to be mains or auto powered (if you've seen reports of this as a Linux-based broadband mobile phone, discount them), but it sounds eminently do-able and compelling. Stein adds that the addition of Bluetooth local comms will make the 'look ma, no wires' picture complete. But why Linux? Nokia's cellular people, and Symbian's sales team, may have screwed-up more than a little here. There are however other developments in the pipeline that make Linux exceedingly plausible in this field - watch this space... ®

The Power of One Brief: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

More from The Register

next story
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple ran off to IBM
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Nadella: Apps must run on ALL WINDOWS – PCs, slabs and mobes
Phone egg, meet desktop chicken - your mother
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
Samsung threatens to cut ties with supplier over child labour allegations
Vows to uphold 'zero tolerance' policy on underage workers
Dude, you're getting a Dell – with BITCOIN: IT giant slurps cryptocash
1. Buy PC with Bitcoin. 2. Mine more coins. 3. Goto step 1
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.