Feeds

Psion to take on MS with notebook-style machines

Anyone remember first time around?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

Psion is returning to the notebook market this week, years after it abandoned development of a brace of intriguing, but commercially unsuccessful, lightweights. This time around the company is scheduled to launch the netBook, announced earlier this year and aimed at the corporate market, plus an unexpected consumer version, the Series 7. Both machines are A4 with approximately full-sized keyboard and colour VGA display, and as with Psion's previous foray into this area they're effectively bigger implementations of the current Series 5 platform (a plausible explanation of where the Series 6 went would be welcome, by the way). The applications that come with Psion's EPOC OS are sufficiently functional to make this translation with relative ease, so it's not particularly difficult for Psion to split its range into pocket computers and larger versions that compete with sub-notebooks and CE devices. Psion claims that customer demand prompted its decision to ship the consumer Series 7 machine after all, and the company seems to be aiming squarely at Microsoft's CE. But CE has had a long, hard slog to establish itself so far, and it's still not absolutely clear what the market for CE products is. Psion could have trouble getting in there, and even if it does, may find there's little or no profit. The two new Psions will cost UKP 699 (ex tax) for the Series 7 and UKP 799 for the netBook. The netBook has a faster CPU, a 190MHz StrongARM, more RAM - 32 megabytes, includes a JVM and networking capabilities. There's no built-in JVM in the Series 7, the CPU is 100MHz, and it's stand-alone. It can run a JVM, but the fact that it's not specifically included suggests Psion's still having problems in getting Java to run reasonably on lower spec hardware. Register historical note: Psion's previous attempts at the notebook market were the MC400 and MC600. Both were A4-ish with mono LCD, and one ran the precursor to EPOC. The other, intended to deal with the market's PC mania (remember when people wouldn't buy stuff because they weren't PC compatible?) ran Dos. Like the Cambridge Z88, they were bought by a few enthusiasts and quantities of journalists, then quietly faded away. ®

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.