Feeds

Intel abandons server Rambus efforts

Problems with Carmel frustrate Chipsetzilla efforts

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Intel Developer Forum Reliable sources have told The Register that Intel's efforts to implement Rambus technology in its Carmel chipset for standard high volume servers have come to nothing. Carmel is Intel's server Rambus chipset, which can optionally use the Repeater chipset for machines with very large memory arrays. Over the last six months, a team of Intel engineers have attempted to design a Carmel chipset based motherboard for a quad server but that project has now been abandoned. Instead, Chipsetzilla will now use the Reliance chipset for its quad processor, which will use DRAM, instead. As reported here from Computex in June, engineers are doubtful that large arrays of Rambus RIMMs will ever run at 400MHz (800MT/s). Board firms will also have trouble producing reliable boards to run at 400MHz, the sources added. One of the problems is that Rambus technology are microwave circuits and engineers at mobo manufacturers do not have the technical skill to produce such designs. The 354MHz Rambus channels only tipped up on roadmaps over the last three months and specs for the DRCG clock generators use a divider ratio of 8/3. Translated into system terms, the REFCLK frequency of 100MHz generates a Rambus channel frequency of 267MHz, which does not give any performance gains at all. But if the REFCLK input is changed to 133MHz, identical to the front side bus (FSB) frequency, the rabbit pulled out of this piece of Intel magic gives a frequency of 355MHz. This gives a peak channel of 1.42GB/s and there is enough margin to run a reliable Rambus channel by most mobo makers. Sources added that when Intel tested the first prototype Rambus boards earlier this year, they discovered problems due to intersymbol interference and power plane noise. The divide ratio popped out of nowhere shortly after this discovery. No-one at Intel was available to comment on these reports on Saturday night at 8 pm. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Whitepapers

Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.